Phox Pop magazine

A printed magazine about thinkers, seekers, makers, and doers

Through carefully crafted words and striking images, the magazine tells the stories of ambitious and inspiring people, and their creative and curious pursuits.

Inside its ad-free pages is a free-range selection of stories of and by people from fields including art, science, history, exploration, and experimentation.

Phox Pop magazine is a cabinet of curiosities in paper and ink form.

Five issues, of 1,000 copies each, published between December 2015 and August 2018

Stories from the magazine

Queens Of The Stone Age

Queens Of The Stone Age

Scientists have determined that the spread of culture, technology, and ideas in Central Europe during the transition from the Stone Age to the Bronze Age was largely down to women. An analysis of ancient skeletons buried in present-day Germany has revealed that almost...

They Think, Therefore They Are…?

They Think, Therefore They Are…?

In 2009, Monica Gagliano had what she now calls a “fish crisis”. After 10 years working as a marine ecologist, focusing on relationships between organisms and their physical and social environments, she came to an uneasy realisation about the inevitable death of it...

Save Our Scents

Save Our Scents

When people are asked about their favourite smells, very often the answer is something associated with their childhood. For Cecilia Bembibre, who grew up in rural Argentina, what immediately comes to her mind is “the smell of the harvester, the smell of the animals”....

Girl Power

Girl Power

Syd Moore has always felt an affinity for witches. As a child, when her Nan told her fairytales, it wasn’t the princesses Moore aspired to be, “I was always more drawn to the witch characters,” she says. “The princesses just seemed to hang around, waiting to get...

Lasting Impressions

Lasting Impressions

​Thomas Edison was a prolific inventor. At the time of his death in 1931, he had more than 1,000 US patents to his name; 2,000+ if you count those he held around the entire world. He was responsible for some of the most ground-breaking and influential developments in...

Reverse Engineered Absinthe

Reverse Engineered Absinthe

The scientist-turned-detective-turned-distiller who made it his mission to restore the reputation of an infamous spirit and reintroduce it to a new generation. Ted Breaux, a research scientist from New Orleans, USA, was well accustomed to analysing samples of water...

The Brains Behind The Band

The Brains Behind The Band

Science and sound come together to create a post-human music machine with real-world implications for brain training and therapy. If the future is now, then Guy Ben-Ary is its musical conductor. The US-born, Australia-based artist and researcher has created the...

Alpha, Gamma, Aha!

Alpha, Gamma, Aha!

A flash of insight might feel like a spontaneous, instantaneous revelation, but experts say they can see signs that something is brewing several seconds in advance. Neuroscientists John Kounios and Mark Beeman used electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic...

Kepler’s Cosmic Cup

Kepler’s Cosmic Cup

There was a time when astrology and astronomy were not so scientifically, diametrically opposed. A time when Johannes Kepler wrote horoscopes for the royal court while also writing requests to the Duke for money to build a pioneering new model of the solar system....

How A Taste For Pasta Begat Dudes (≈ Hipsters)

How A Taste For Pasta Begat Dudes (≈ Hipsters)

The mid-18th Century was what you might call 'peak Grand Tour', when the trend for young British men visiting the continent's most cosmopolitan cities and famous sites was at its height. These men returned home affected by the experience. Their style, their dress,...

Bureau Of Memories

Bureau Of Memories

Through the largest of Bethlem Hospital’s remaining apple orchards, over badger sets, and past a light pole on which kestrels are often seen perching, can be found a wood pile. This repository for the gardeners’ waste is what Sue Burbidge, craftswoman and Bethlem...

Who Do You Think You Are?

Who Do You Think You Are?

Australia has an unpleasant history when it comes to national identity, and trying to impose one. A white one. Like in 1901, when descendants of the ‘founders’ who claimed Australia as their own — despite it already being inhabited by Aboriginal and Torres Strait...

Of Multi-Generational Migration Fame

Of Multi-Generational Migration Fame

“The first time I ever saw them was in February of 1977. We were walking along a road and it was overcast and nothing was moving. Then all of a sudden the colour of the forest changed from green to grey and I realised I was looking at a wall of monarch butterflies. It...

Pyramid Of Death

Pyramid Of Death

In the 1820s, the tallest building in London was St Paul’s Cathedral, at 111 metres high. But architect Thomas Willson had grander plans. In 1829 he proposed to build a massive granite pyramid on Primrose Hill. It would rise 290 metres and cover a site of 18.5 acres....

Petrichor

Petrichor

The natural world is full of gods, goddesses and other mythological creatures, in name, if not spirit. For nomenclature convention draws heavily on the Greek and Roman classics when labelling new species and other scientific phenomena. One particularly pleasing term –...

Hallucinogenic Books

Hallucinogenic Books

Libraries can expand your mind in more ways than one. A leading London mycologist has claimed that old books, particularly those stored in less than perfect conditions, can provide inspiration without the need to read even a single word; just take a deep breath. In...

Witches Brew

Witches Brew

The general knowledge of women’s role in the invention of beer, and the establishment of the industry around it, has largely been lost to the hands of time, and…. witch-hunters? “Some 10 years ago, on a warm autumn afternoon, I saw a witch and had an epiphany – an...

Photographic Revolution

Photographic Revolution

Edwin Herbert Land was a visionary scientist and inventor who 70 years ago changed the picture-taking habits of people around the world, the result of which is still felt today. Land pioneered a technique that produced fully-developed photos at the touch of a button,...

X Marks The Spot

X Marks The Spot

This is a tale of two halves. It begins around the turn of the 20th century, with the establishment of a new private printing press near the banks of the Thames, and comes to a dramatic close in the winter of 1916, under cover of darkness, on Hammersmith Bridge. The...

Oh Coffee, How We Do Love Thee

Oh Coffee, How We Do Love Thee

Britain is in love with a little brown bean called coffee. It's an affair that dates back more than 350 years to the edge of a churchyard in St Michael's Alley, off Cornhill, in east central London. It was there, in 1652, that Pasqua Rosee (servant to a businessman...